Monday, August 07, 2006

NGC to Display Proof Dollars from the BRS Legacy Collection at ANA World’s Fair of Money

During the ANA World’s Fair of Money, August 16 to 19, NGC will display a selection of proof dollars from the BRS Legacy Collection, which includes classic rarities and numerous visually stunning, condition census pieces.

The body of the exhibit consists of 30 Proof Morgan Dollars, comprising a complete date run from 1878 to 1921. Each coin was selected for the combination of its aesthetic and technical quality. Many of these coins are tied for the finest known of their issue, and the collection includes five Morgan Dollars graded PF-69, the highest grade ever assigned to a coin of this type. Other highlights include both varieties of the 1921 Proof Dollar; the 1921 Zerbe S$1 is graded NGC PF-66 Cameo and the 1921 Chapman S$1 graded NGC PF-66.

As a measure of this set’s visual appeal, it should be noted that 11 of the 30 coins have received the designation, or star designation, from NGC. The star designation is NGC’s unique identifier for coins possessing extraordinary eye appeal. For the entire Proof Morgan Dollar series, NGC has graded just 43 coins with this coveted star designation. More than a quarter of all the star-designated Proof Morgan Dollars, therefore, reside in this collection.

Mark Salzberg, Chairman of NGC, comments on the significance of this collection: “This set is a very special combination of visual appeal and overall technical quality. These attributes show the diligence of this astute collector, and make for a very impressive display. It’s hard to imagine a more compelling set of Proof Morgan Dollars.”

Also included in NGC’s exhibit of the BRS Legacy Collection is a pair of Proof Seated Liberty Dollars, dated 1866. The first coin is an 1866 No Motto graded NGC PF-63. It is one of just two known of this transitional issue, and considered to be the rarest Federal issue coin listed in the Redbook. The Motto, IN GOD WE TRUST, was added to large-size silver and gold Federal issue coinage in 1866, following the Civil War. A very limited number of presentation coins without Motto were struck.

The second in the pair is an 1866 Motto Seated Liberty Dollar graded NGC PF-69. It is the only Seated Liberty Dollar with Motto to receive this exalted grade at NGC.

The BRS Legacy Collection was assembled under the guidance of Laura Sperber, President of Legend Numismatics in Lincroft, New Jersey. “Working with BRS has been a thrill, observed Sperber. “His dedication to his sets and his eye for quality are rivaled by few collectors and dealers.” Of this display, she comments, “The fact the exhibit includes six 69’s to me is unreal, because I never would have thought it could be done. Each of those coins defies the imagination.” This exhibit is the first time that so many dollars graded NGC PF-69 have been displayed together.

The exhibit can be viewed at NGC’s booth #1114 during public hours of the ANA World’s Fair of Money, August 16-19, at the Colorado Convention Center, Denver, CO.

Click here to see pictures from the collection.

- By NGC

Smithsonian Traveling Exhibition Highlights Frontier Gold

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History will present “Frontier Gold,” a traveling display showcasing the pioneer gold and silver coinage that helped change the dynamics of the American West at the American Numismatic Association World Fair of Money convention Aug. 16–19 in Denver, Colo. Featuring artifacts from the museum’s National Numismatic Collection, “Frontier Gold” will highlight some of the most prized coins struck during the precious metal boom of the mid 1800s. Of particular interest are the 1854S United States $5 gold coin, the finest known example of only 268 pieces struck that year, and the 1861 Clark Gruber & Co. $10 piece, which featured a (not authentic) likeness of Pike’s Peak, near the site of the Colorado gold strike.

“These coins illustrate America’s rich frontier gold heritage and how gold revolutionized the economy of the West, making them a fundamental piece of this nation’s history” said Brent D. Glass, director, National Museum of American History.

Numismatic Guaranty Corporation of America and Numismatic Conservation Services, LLC are the presenting sponsors of the exhibition.

“This new exhibition makes some of the greatest coins available to inspire new collectors and to build awareness of numismatics,” said Mark Salzberg, chairman of NGC and NCS. “It’s very satisfying to see it come to fruition as it's exactly what our hobby needs.”

The boom of precious metal strikes—California gold in the 1840s, gold in Colorado in the 1850s, and both gold and silver strikes in Nevada during the 1860s—transformed life in the American West. Enterprising jewelers and metallurgists struck these raw metals into coins and ingots. Many bear images of the American West, displaying a dynamic, regional pride. Other prized objects in the display include the 1861 Parsons and Co. $5 coin, one of only three surviving, and a J. J. Conway & Co. ten-dollar gold piece from the same year, again one of only three known. The discovery of Western precious metals and subsequent coin production fueled local economies and helped to restructure the American monetary system.

This display draws from the museum’s National Numismatic Collection, which consists of more than 1.5 million objects, including coins, medals and paper currency, and preserves the role of money in economic history. The museum will travel additional displays to conventions in Orlando, Fla. in Jan. 2007, to St. Louis, Mo. in April 2007 and Baltimore, Md. in August 2007 customized to the themes of those shows.

- By NGC

United States Mint Celebrates 100 Years in Denver at World’s Fair of Money

The United States Mint will inform and educate visitors, as well as present beautiful collectible products, at the American Numismatic Association’s World’s Fair of Money at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver from August 16 to August 19, 2006.

The United States Mint, located at booth #200 on the first floor of the Colorado Convention Center in the Mint Promenade, will feature perennial favorites such as the 2006 United States Mint Proof Set, 2006 United States Mint Silver Proof Set, 2006 United States Mint Uncirculated Set, as well as 2006-dated American Eagles in gold, silver and platinum.

The popular new 24-Karat American Buffalo Gold Proof Coins will also be available, along with Colorado commemorative quarter-dollar coins in bags and two-roll sets.

Visitors to the United States Mint booth will also be able to access two new exciting website features: the Historian’s Corner and the United States Mint historical timeline. The Historian’s Corner is a new section of the United States Mint’s website where visitors can examine rarely seen United States Mint documents. The Historian’s Corner will become an information resource for tracking the history of U.S. coinage and for conducting research on United States Mint programs and operations. The Historian’s Corner can be found at www.usmint.gov/historianscorner.

The United States Mint historical timeline is a web-based interactive presentation of important people, places and events in the history of the United States Mint. The timeline also features a brief history of the facilities that have served as United States Mint production facilities, assay offices or branch mints. The facilities are represented geographically, and their years of operation are also linked to the timeline function. The timeline’s interactive features also include United States Mint coins and Presidential medals, offering visitors a brief numismatic history of the Nation and a record of Presidential service. The timeline can be accessed by visiting www.usmint.gov/timeline.

The Office of the Historian of the United States Mint will feature a collection of unique historical artifacts, many of them exhibited publicly for the first time. They include original photographs that chronicle the United States Mint’s 100-year history of coin production in Denver, Colorado.

For its first 46 years, the United States Mint at Denver was an assay office in the Clark, Gruber and Company Bank Building. Miners brought in gold dust and nuggets to be melted, assayed and cast into bars stamped by weight and quality. In 1904, the United States Government decided to convert the assay office into a working mint, and build a much grander facility, an Italian Renaissance-style building modeled after a Florentine palace. In 1906, its first year of operation, the United States Mint at Denver produced 167,371,035 gold and silver coins valued at $27 million. Today, output at Denver can exceed 50 million coins a day.

Two United States Mint employees, April Stafford and Debbie Dawson, will receive the ANA’s Outstanding Government Service Award, which “recognizes an individual in public service, working for a government, governmental agency or international organization, or retiree who has helped advance the interests of collectors of coins, tokens, medals and paper money.” Ms. Stafford and Ms. Dawson have provided leadership on the United States Mint Education Initiative, including the award-winning kid’s site, United States Mint H.I.P. Pocket Change.

- By US Mint

United States Mint to Display Ten 1933 Double Eagles at World’s Fair of Money

Coin collectors, history buffs and those who are simply curious will get a golden opportunity to see the 10 recently recovered 1933 Double Eagles at the American Numismatic Association’s World’s Fair of Money® in Denver August 16-19.

The United States Mint has secured these national treasures at Fort Knox until now. This will mark the first time the United States Mint will put the historic artifacts on display for their owners: the American people. The four-day event is open to the public and admission is free.

The 10 gold pieces were illegally removed from the United States Mint at Philadelphia more than 70 years ago. After United States Mint officials enlisted the assistance of the Secret Service and the Department of Justice, the Secret Service recovered the 10 Double Eagles in Philadelphia for the United States Mint in late 2004. The gold pieces were authenticated last year as genuine 1933 Double Eagles.

One 1933 Double Eagle surfaced in 1996 and was recovered by the Secret Service. Following a legal settlement, that gold piece was returned to the United States Mint and was subsequently issued and auctioned in New York City to an anonymous buyer for $7.5 million on July 30, 2002. The United States Department of the Treasury has said that it does not intend to monetize, issue or auction the 10 recently recovered 1933 Double Eagles.

United States Mint Acting Director David Lebryk will unveil the 10 fabled 1933 Double Eagles at the Opening Ceremony of the ANA’s World’s Fair of Money on Wednesday, August 16 in Denver. They will be a marquis exhibit of the Nation’s largest coin show which runs through Saturday, August 19.

What: Unveiling by the United States Mint of Ten 1933 Double Eagles at the Opening Ceremony of the ANA’s World’s Fair of Money

Who: United States Mint Acting Director David A. Lebryk

When: 9:45 a.m., Wednesday, August 16, 2006

Where: Colorado Convention Center, Hall C, 700 14th Street, Denver

- By US Mint

CCAC to Meet in Denver August 18

The Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC) will meet Friday, August 18 at the American Numismatic Association’s World’s Fair of Money® in Denver, Colorado at 10 a.m.

The purpose of the meeting is to conduct business associated with the CCAC’s responsibility to advise the Secretary of the Treasury on themes and designs pertaining to United States coinage.

The United States Mint will present new design candidates to the CCAC for the obverse (heads side) and reverse (tails side) of the:

• 2007 Little Rock Central High School Desegregation 50th Anniversary Commemorative Coins

• Medal for the 73rd Secretary of the Treasury, John W. Snow

• Proposed 2008 First Spouse reverse design narratives also will be reviewed.

The CCAC will also hold a PUBLIC FORUM in which those attending the convention may share their thoughts regarding American coin design.

Who: Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC)

Pursuant to 31 U.S.C. 5135, the CCAC was established to:

• Advise the Secretary of the Treasury on any theme or design proposals relating to circulating coinage, bullion coinage, Congressional gold medals, and national and other medals produced by the Secretary;

• Advise the Secretary of the Treasury with regard to the events, persons, or places that the Committee recommends to be commemorated; and

• Advise the Secretary of the Treasury with respect to the mintage level for any commemorative coin recommended.

When: Friday, August 18, 2006, 10 a.m. (MT)

Public Forum: 11 a.m. (MT)

Note: The CCAC meeting and Public Forum is open to the public. News media are welcome.

Where: American Numismatic Association’s World’s Fair of Money®

Colorado Convention Center, Room 706 Denver, Colorado

- By US Mint

United States Mint Issues New Nationwide Call for Artists

The United States Mint is inviting artists from throughout the United States to participate in its Artistic Infusion Program (AIP) to enrich and invigorate the design of coins and medals. A new call for artists will be issued, as the United States Mint announces modifications to the three-year-old program.

The new invitations seek up to 10 Associate Designers – professional visual artists – and up to six Student Designers – undergraduate and graduate level artists – to supplement the pool of “Master Designers” currently under contract in the program.

Although the United States Mint has utilized outside artists before, the AIP was specifically designed to develop and train a pool of talented outside artists ready to work with the United States Mint’s staff of sculptor-engravers to create new coin and medal designs.

“We are pleased with the success of the Artistic Infusion Program,” said Acting United States Mint Director David A. Lebryk. “Great designs can inspire and educate.”

AIP artists have submitted successful designs for high-profile programs such as the Westward Journey Nickel Series™, the 50 State Quarters® Program, the American Eagle Platinum Coin Program, the Presidential $1 Coin Program, the First Spouse Gold Coin Program, and other commemorative coin and medal programs.

Applications responding to the call for Associate Designers will be accepted from August 7 to September 15, and applications responding to the call for Student Designers will be accepted from September 15 to October 16, 2006.

The United States Mint also is announcing refinements to the AIP. Artists will now be invited to participate in the program at three levels: United States Mint Master Designers, United States Mint Associate Designers and United States Mint Student Designers.

Under the revised program, the United States Mint will continue contracts for up to 10 Master Designers. Through this application process, the United States Mint will select up to 10 Associate Designers, and up to six Student Designers. Students will participate in a summer internship with the United States Mint Sculptor-Engravers at the United States Mint at Philadelphia.

“I am confident that the changes we have made will help our young artists to succeed and bring even more creative energy and ideas to the program,” said Acting Director Lebryk. “This will help ensure a bright future for the tradition of American coin design.”

For purposes of the AIP, Master Designers are those who have proven themselves as valuable AIP artists for at least two years; Associate Designers are professional artists who are new to the program (with successful Associate Designers eligible for direct promotion to the Master Designer level); and Student Designers are those enrolled in undergraduate or graduate level visual arts programs (with successful Student Designers eligible for direct promotion to the Associate Designer level).

Under the program’s new provisions, each Master Designer submitting designs will receive an honorarium of $1,500; Associate Designers will receive $1,000; and Student Designers $500. Each will receive an additional $2,000 per design selected. They will be invited to create and submit at least one design candidate annually for a coin or medal program.

United States Mint sculptor-engravers will continue to model the designs submitted by the Artistic Infusion Program artists. The sculptor-engravers also submit designs under the program.

Artists who are U.S. citizens should submit a completed application that will include samples of their work. A design exercise for applicants will also be required. Interested artists are required to use the “Call for Artists Application Packet,” which includes program details, eligibility requirements, artistic criteria and detailed application guidelines.

Click www.usmint.com/artists to access the application online, or contact the United States Mint at (202) 354-7727, or at art@usmint.treas.gov. Submissions will be evaluated on several factors, including drawing ability, compositional skills, and level to which the design demonstrates research of subject matter.

- By US Mint

Monday, July 24, 2006

Nation Gets Second Chance to Buy Historic Nickels from the United States Mint

Recently signed legislation authorizes the United States Mint once again to sell products containing the popular 2004 and 2005 Westward Journey Nickel Series™ 5-cent coins (nickels). The United States Mint’s remaining bags and rolls of nickels, first day coin covers and silver proof sets containing the nickels will go on sale at noon (ET) on July 25, 2006.

The Westward Journey Nickel Series marked the first time in 66 years that the Nation’s nickel was redesigned. A series of four images on the reverse -- "Peace Medal," "Keelboat," "American Bison" and "Ocean in View" – commemorate the bicentennials of the Lewis and Clark expedition and the Louisiana Purchase. The fifth nickel, completing the series, is the 2006 "Return to Monticello" coin that features a forward-facing Thomas Jefferson on the obverse (head side) and Monticello on the reverse.

Legislation signed in 2003 that authorized the Westward Journey Nickel Series also ended the United States Mint’s authority to issue these coins on December 31, 2005. A "Technical Correction" to the San Francisco Old Mint Commemorative Coin Act signed by President Bush on June 15, 2006, declared that the Secretary of the Treasury "may continue to issue, after December 31, 2005, numismatic items that contain 5-cent coins minted in the years 2004 and 2005." The United States Mint has maintained that if this legislation became law, the United States Mint would offer remaining inventory for sale again. There will be an order limit of 10 per order per household for the United States Mint Silver Proof Set™.

These remaining United States Mint products will once again be available for sale:
2005 Westward Journey Nickel Series™ Coin Set
Westward Journey Nickel Series™ – American Bison "P" 500-coin bag
Westward Journey Nickel Series™ – American Bison "D" 500-coin bag
Westward Journey Nickel Series™ – American Bison "P" 1,000-coin bag
Westward Journey Nickel Series™ – American Bison "D" 1,000-coin bag
Westward Journey Nickel Series™ – American Bison Two-Roll Set
Westward Journey Nickel Series™ – Ocean in View "P" 500-coin bag
Westward Journey Nickel Series™ – Ocean in View "D" 500-coin bag
Westward Journey Nickel Series™ – Ocean in View "P" 1,000-coin bag
Westward Journey Nickel Series™ – Ocean in View "D" 1,000-coin bag
Westward Journey Nickel Series™ – Ocean in View Two-Roll Set
2004 Westward Journey Nickel Series™ Official First Day Coin Cover - Peace Medal
2004 Westward Journey Nickel Series™ Official First Day Coin Cover - Keelboat
2005 Westward Journey Nickel Series™ Official First Day Coin Cover – American Bison
2005 Westward Journey Nickel Series™ Official First Day Coin Cover – Ocean in View
2005 United States Mint Silver Proof Set™

- By US Mint

Teletrade Begins Currency Auctions

Teletrade, America's largest telephone and Internet auction company for certified coins, now will conduct auctions of certified paper money. The first Teletrade Certified Currency Auction will take place on Sunday, September 10, 2006.

"With the increase in activity in the paper money market, we've had many clients ask us to hold auctions for certified currency. Within days of informally telling people we planned to launch the new service we had over 200 lots consigned for the inaugural currency auction in September," said Ian Russell, Teletrade President.

One of the items already consigned to the first currency auction is a 1914 $5 Federal Reserve Note (Fr. 851a) graded PMG Superb Gem-67.

"With the wide acceptance of third-party currency grading, this was a logical expansion for Teletrade®. There are a large number of coin collectors who now are active in the paper money market."

Currently Teletrade is accepting currency certified by either Professional Coin Grading Service Currency (PCGS Currency) or Paper Money Guaranty (PMG) for consignments to Teletrade® auctions.

"PCGS Currency and PMG are offering special rates starting at only $8 per item to certify notes consigned to Teletrade®. This is similar to the popular certification discounts available to consignors of coins," said Russell.

Founded in 1986, Teletrade® has over 152,000 registered users and is one of the most frequently visited coin-related websites on the Internet. Auctions are held every Sunday, Monday and Wednesday.

- By Teletrade

Wednesday, July 12, 2006

NGC to Display Highlights from the James Watt Jr. Collection at ANA World’s Fair of Money

A collection of Superb Proof George III coinage, formerly owned and produced by Soho Mint Master James Watt Jr., will be on display at the NGC booth during the American Numismatic Association World’s Fair of Money, August 16 – 19 in Denver, Colorado. The exhibit is provided courtesy of Aspen Park Rare Coins.



Bronze Farthing NGC PF66 BN


Copper Half Penny NGC PF67 RD ULTRA CAMEO


1805 Ireland Penny in Gilt NGC PF66 ULTRA CAMEO


1804 Great Britain Bank Dollar NGC PF67 BN


1813 Isle of Man Penny NGC PF67 BN CAMEO



Silver-lined brass shells and paper wrapping that housed each coin in the James Watt Jr. Collection until late 2002. Courtesy Aspen Park Rare Coins.



James Watt Jr. was Mint Master at the Soho, England mint from the late 1700s through 1840. His father was James Watt, a famed engineer and inventor who made major improvements to the Newcomen steam engine, a machine later used by his son at the Soho minting facility.

James Watt Jr. struck a number of cameo proof coins of George III for his own collection. He fashioned silver-lined brass coin shells to provide an airtight container for each coin. These coins were passed down through the family generations until a November 13, 2002 auction of the estate in London.

The Morton and Eden Auction catalog states of this collection: “The majority of the coins and medals are of proof quality and they are offered with the pairs of pressed bronze protective ‘shells’ in which they were originally housed… Following James Watt Junior’s death, the collection was moved to Doldowlod and was recorded by Elizabeth Stockdale Wilkinson, one of his executors: ‘This Bureau contains the articles brought from Aston — and the Coins & Medals are in the carved oak box in Mr. Watt’s dressing closet at Doldowlod — E.S.W. May 13, 1849.’ The coins and medals have remained largely undisturbed at Doldowlod ever since…”

The James Watt Jr. Proof coins are exquisite cameo strikings, and their preservation and visual aesthetics are essentially unparalleled among coinage of their era. The collection of Mathew Boulton, Watt’s partner at the Soho Mint, yielded no coins of equal stature to the Watt proofs.

The coins, mostly Farthings, Half Pennies and Pennies, struck in Bronzed Copper, Copper and Gilt, have remained in essentially “as made” condition. All were submitted to NGC, where they received grades ranging from PF66 to PF68 Ultra Cameo.

The collection includes a 9-piece set of British Copper, Bronze and Gilt Farthings, Half Pennies and Pennies, dated 1806.

Bronze:
Farthing NGC PF66 BN [Pictured]
Half Penny NGC PF67 BN
Penny NGC PF67 BN


Copper:
Farthing NGC PF67 RD ULTRA CAMEO
Half Penny NGC PF67 RD ULTRA CAMEO [Pictured]
Penny NGC PF66 RD ULTRA CAMEO


Gilt:
Farthing NGC PF68 ULTRA CAMEO
Half Penny NGC PF68 ULTRA CAMEO
Penny PF67 NGC ULTRA CAMEO


Additional Highlights:
1806 Ireland Farthing in Bronze NGC PF66 BN CAMEO
1799 Great Britain Half Penny in Bronze NGC PF67 BN
1797 Great Britain Penny in Bronze NGC PF65 BN
1805 Ireland Penny in Bronze NGC PF67 BN CAMEO
1805 Ireland Penny in Gilt NGC PF66 ULTRA CAMEO [Pictured]
1797 Great Britain 2 Penny NGC PF65 BN
1804 Great Britain Bank Dollar NGC PF67 BN [Pictured]
1813 Isle of Man Penny NGC PF67 BN CAMEO [Pictured]

The Watt Family:
James Watt, Sr. (1698 – 1782) was a ship fitter and syndicate manager in Greenock, who lived all his life in Scotland.

James Watt the Engineer (1736 – 1819) began his career as a maker of scientific instruments in Glasgow where, in the 1760s, he developed his idea of a separate condenser to improve the efficiency of the Newcomen steam engine. He met Matthew Boulton in 1768. Their formal partnership of Boulton & Watt, which was to have such momentous implications for the Industrial Revolution as a whole, began in 1775.

James Watt, Jr. (1769 – 1848) traveled and studied in Europe as a young man, became a radical and was embroiled for a period in the politics of the French Revolution. On his return home, he was settled into a partnership in a new enterprise named Boutlon, Watt & Sons, founded in 1794. James Watt, Jr. was instrumental in obtaining a number of coining contracts for the Soho Mint until his partnership with Matthew Boulton was dissolved in 1840.

- By NGC

The Lake Michigan and Springdale Collections Top $8 Million

American Numismatic Rarities recently held a blockbuster auction event in conjunction with the MidAmerican Coin Exposition in Rosemont, Illinois. Crossing the block were nearly 3000 lots of rare numismatic material across all collecting interests. When all was said and done, over $8.2 million was sold in the three session sale.

A nice selection of world coins was featured in the first session with highlights including an 1839 Bank of Montreal Side View halfpenny, graded MS-64 BN that realized $4,025. A beautiful gem 1768 Tuscany Francescone in MS-65 (PCGS) soared to $8,050 and a 1797 Russian rouble in AU-58 also sold at a strong price of $8,050.

Colonials featured a very rare Noe-24 Oak Tree threepence in EF-40 which went to a new home at $7,475; a scarce Liverpool halfpenny in EF-45 sold at $5,060; and a choice 1792 Washington Born Virginia in VF-20 realized a total of $5,060.

An extremely rare 1851 Proof half cent Proof-64 BN (PCGS), one of only two specimens confirmed and the only specimen certified by either service, went through the roof at $34,500. Onlookers were amazed as the bidding war continued for several minutes between aggressive bidders. A sharp and attractive 1793 Wreath cent, Vine and Bars, in AU-50 (NGC) went to a happy bidder at $16,673.85. Copper highlights continued with a choice Proof-63 (NGC) 1856 Flying Eagle cent brought $18,400; a splendid 1884 Proof-68 BN (NGC) realized $8,625; and a superb gem 1901 Proof-68 RD (NGC) soared to $9,775.

Exonumia was well represented in this event and also showed strength in the prices realized. An extremely rare Hero of Freedom Medal in silver graded AU brought $11,500. The rare Sands’ Ale five cent encased postage stamp astounded the auction gallery as it was bid to $18,400!

Strong bidding interest was evident as patterns crossed the block. An incredibly rare 1849 Bouvet pattern $10, Judd App.C 1849-1 in MS-61 BN (PCGS), went to an avid collector at $26,450. The rare 1867 nickel pattern half eagle mule, J-601 in Proof-63 (NGC) soared to $34,500. Believed to be unique and the only specimen graded by NGC, the 1869 pattern quarter eagle, J-771 in Proof-65 (NGC) realized a strong price at $21,850. The 1873 silver Trade dollar, J-1311 in Proof-65 (NGC) went to a new home at $32,200. A strikingly toned 1876 copper double eagle pattern J-1491 in Proof-65 BN (NGC) was bid to an incredible $50,600. An 1879 pattern fifty cents, Barber’s famous “Washlady” motif, J-1598 in Proof-65 RB (PCGS) delighted the audience at $19,550.

The finest certified NGC 1861 three-cent silver, graded MS-68*, brought $16,100 followed by a gem 1924-S Buffalo nickel, MS-65 (PCGS) realizing $13,800. An impressive 1794 half dime in MS-65 (PCGS) brought an strong price of $77,625; a toned 1795 half dime in MS-65 (PCGS) sold at an amazing $63,825; a superb gem 1853 Arrows half dime in MS-67 (PCGS) went to a new home at $12,650.

Highlights continued in silver coinage with an elusive 1802 JR-3 dime in EF-40 (PCGS) which brought $14,950; a rare 1804, 14 stars reverse dime in VF-20 (NGC) sold for $26,450; and a lovely 1853 Arrows dime in MS-67 (PCGS) realized $15,525. A highly desirable 1796 quarter, Browning-2, in VG-8 (PCGS) went to a delighted buyer at $20,700; followed by an extremely rare two-tailed Washington quarter in MS-66 (NGC) which soared to $36,800 and a choice MS-63 (PCGS) 1919-D half dollar which realized $20,700.

The silver dollar series, always a popular ANR offering, led off with an lovely 1795 Flowing Hair BB-14 in AU-55 (PCGS) which sold at $37,950; an important 1836 Gobrecht J-60 in Proof-63 (NGC) realized $32,200; a choice 1893-O in MS-64 (PCGS) brought $20,125; and a gem 1927-S MS-65 (PCGS) delighted a new buyer at $17,250.

Gold was the hit of the evening as a scarce 1802 quarter eagle, Breen-1, MS-61 (NGC) sold at $27,600; a lovely 1829 quarter eagle in MS-64 (NGC) was bid to $41,400; an important 1795 $5 in MS-62 (PCGS) went through the roof at $109,250; a beautiful 1880 $5 in MS-64 (NGC) went to a collector at $57,500; and a gem 1834 $5 MS-65 (NGC) realized $41,400.




1876 pattern double eagle.
J-1491, P-1644.
Rarity-7+.
Proof 65 BN (NGC).
Realized $50,600



1794 Half Dime Logan McCloskey-2,
Valentine-2.
Rarity-5.
MS 65 (PCGS).
Realized $77,625



1914-S $10 MS 66 (PCGS).
Realized $253,000



MCMVII (1907) G$20 High Relief,
Flat Rim.
MS 67 (PCGS)
Realized $195,500.00



1930-S $20 MS 65 (PCGS).
Realized $184,000



1931-D $20 MS 65 (PCGS).
Realized $169,625



Eagles delighted collectors as an 1798/7 9x4 Stars AU-53 (PCGS) brought $63,250; an exceptional 1907 Indian, No Periods, MS-66 (PCGS) sold for $23,000; and an important 1914-S in MS-66 (PCGS) brought down the house at $253,000! As the finest specimen certified by PCGS, all alone atop the Population Report at MS-66, competition was fierce both on the floor and several phone lines.

Double eagles, including those featured from the Springdale Collection, continued the bidding frenzy as a classic 1921 in MS-62 (PCGS) sold for at $126,500; a rare 1927-S in MS-64 (PCGS) brought $74,500; the landmark 1930-S in MS-65 (PCGS) soared to $184,000; an incredible 1931-D in MS-65 (PCGS) amazed the audience at $169,625; and the superb gem MCMVII High Relief in MS-67 (PCGS), ex F.C.C. Boyd, garnered applause at $195,500!

American Numismatic Rarities is a team of professionals with nearly 300 years combined experience in numismatic auctions: Christine Karstedt, Q. David Bowers, Dr. Richard A. Bagg, John Pack, Frank Van Valen, John Kraljevich, and photographer Douglas Plasencia, among others. Founded with a goal of presenting the finest numismatic auctions in America, the next ANR event is scheduled for August in Denver, CO, followed by September in New York City. For more information about our auctions or for details on how to consign to a future event, contact American Numismatic Rarities at Box 1804, Wolfeboro, New Hampshire, 03894 or call 866-811-1804. The American Numismatic Rarities website, including full photos and text from all previous ANR sales, is available online at www.anrcoins.com.

- By ANR

Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee to View New Design Candidates for Little Rock Central High Desegregation 50th Anniversary Commemorative Coin

The United States Mint will present new design candidates for the 2007 Little Rock Central High School Desegregation 50th Anniversary Commemorative Coin at the July 19, 2006, public meeting of the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC) in Washington D.C.

The purpose of the meeting is to conduct business associated with the CCAC’s responsibility to advise the Secretary of the Treasury on themes and designs pertaining to United States coinage.

Who: Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC)

Pursuant to 31 U.S.C. 5135, the CCAC was established to:

• Advise the Secretary of the Treasury on any theme or design proposals relating to circulating coinage, bullion coinage, Congressional gold medals, and national and other medals produced by the Secretary;

• Advise the Secretary of the Treasury with regard to the events, persons, or places that the Committee recommends to be commemorated; and

• Advise the Secretary of the Treasury with respect to the mintage level for any commemorative coin recommended.

When: Wednesday, July 19, 2006, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Note: This meeting is open to the public. News media are welcome.

Where: United States Mint Headquarters 801 9th St. NW 2nd Floor, Conference Room A Washington, D.C. 20220

- By US Mint

2006 United States Mint Uncirculated Coin Set Available July 18

The United States Mint announced today that it will begin selling the 2006 United States Mint Uncirculated Coin Set on July 18, 2006, at 12:00 noon (ET), featuring the popular satin finish that was introduced last year.

This year’s 20-coin United States Mint Uncirculated Coin Set – available for $16.95 – includes uncirculated versions of each 2006-dated circulating United States coin, bearing the Philadelphia ‘P’ and Denver ‘D’ mint mark: the Lincoln cent, the “Return to Monticello” 5-cent coin (nickel) – featuring the final obverse and reverse designs from the Westward Journey Nickel Series – as well as the Roosevelt dime, the Kennedy half-dollar and the Golden Dollar. (Note: the one-cent coin struck in Philadelphia does not bear a mint mark.)

The set also includes all five of the 2006-dated coins in the United States Mint’s 50 State Quarters® Program – Nevada, Nebraska, Colorado, North Dakota and South Dakota. Each set is packaged in polyester film and includes a Certificate of Authenticity.

Customers can purchase the United States Mint Uncirculated Coin Set through the United States Mint’s secure website at www.usmint.gov, or by calling toll-free 1-800-USA-MINT (872-6468) 8:00 a.m. to midnight (ET), seven days a week. Hearing- and speech-impaired customers may order by calling 1-888-321-MINT (6468) 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (ET), Monday through Friday.

- By US Mint

Heritage Makes It Short

In an effort to simplify their presence on the World Wide Web, Dallas-based Heritage Auction Galleries has announced that their new URL will be HA.com.

"This is all part of our effort to make our web identity as simple and memorable as possible," said Paul Minshull, Chief Operating Officer of Heritage. "We're always looking for ways to make our website more user-friendly, and we feel this is an important step in that direction."

"Our main web identity of HeritageAuctions.com will remain as such," said Minshull, "with HA.com redirecting to that, but now our friends and clients will be able to access our many powerful internet features with just a few taps on the keyboard."

All of Heritage's current URLs will work with HA.com. For example, HeritageAuctions.com/Sell, which directs interested parties to a page discussing consignment terms, will now function as HA.com/Sell.

"In the coming days and weeks, you'll be seeing more enhancements to our website," Minshull said, "all designed to make the Heritage website more powerful and, at the same time, more user-friendly."

- By Heritage

PCGS To Exhibit Finest Stella Set at ANA Denver Convention



The finest registered collection of extremely rare "Stella" $4 denomination gold pattern coins of 1879 and 1880 will be displayed by Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) during the American Numismatic Association World's Fair of Money® convention in Denver, August 16 - 19, 2006.

Visitors to the PCGS booth can obtain a complimentary, illustrated educational pamphlet about the history of Stellas, as well as see the collection in person.

"The odd denomination, four-dollar coin is one of the most famous and popular sets in all of American numismatics. They are classic American rarities with the possibility of less than eight complete sets that could be assembled by collectors because some of the coins are in museum collections," said Ron Guth, PCGS President.

"The four-coin set has a PCGS Set RegistrySM combined grade average of Proof 66.10 out of a possible set rating of 66.80."

"The anonymous owner of the set will display the coins courtesy of Superior Galleries, Beverly Hills, California. The set is registered with PCGS under the name, Superior Galleries," said B.J. Searls, PCGS Registry Manager.


"The name, Stella, comes from the large, five-point star on the reverse of the two types of four-dollar denomination gold coins made in 1879 and 1880. They were produced only in proof format each year with a Flowing Hair type and Coiled Hair type," explained Guth.

# The four coins in the set are graded as follows. 1879 Flowing Hair, PCGS PR-66 Deep Cameo (estimated mintage: 700+)
# 1879 Coiled Hair, PCGS PR-66 Cameo (only 12 specimens known)
# 1880 Flowing Hair, PCGS PR-65 Cameo (17 known)
# 1880 Coiled Hair, PCGS PR-64 Cameo (8 known)

The exhibit will be at booth number 1132 during the ANA Denver convention.


- By PCGS

Thursday, June 29, 2006

NGC Named Approved Depository for Collateral Finance Corporation

NGC has been named an approved depository for Collateral Finance Corporation, which provides loans secured by bullion and rare coins. The relationship between NGC and Collateral Finance Corporation will enable borrowers to expedite the loan process for coins warehoused by NGC during the NGC certification process.

Collateral Finance Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of A-Mark Precious Metals, is a California Finance Lender and will be issuing loans from $50,000 to $5,000,000 on coins submitted to NGC for grading. Numismatic lending of this type assists dealers in building inventory, acquiring large collections, and maintaining liquidity during the certification process. In the past, such financing has not been available in direct association with the services offered by NGC.

Steven Eichenbaum, CEO of NGC, comments “We are pleased to have formed this relationship with Collateral Financial Corporation, a market leader in numismatic lending. It enables us to offer a broader suite of services to our submitters, as well as providing ready access to numismatic funding while their coins are on our premises. This is a vital component to transacting business in today’s numismatic marketplace.”

Parties interested in numismatic collateralized loans for NGC coins should contact Thor Gjerdrum at Collateral Finance Corporation directly at thor@amark.com or by phone at (310) 587-1414. NGC Customer Service can be contacted at service@ngccoin.com or by phone at 1-800-NGC-COIN.

- By NGC

American Buffalo Gold Proof Coin Available from the United States Mint Beginning June 22

The United States Mint today announced that the American Buffalo Gold Proof Coin, the first pure gold coin issued by the United States Government for sale to the public, will be available June 22, 2006, beginning at noon (ET).

The United States Mint will produce a $50 face value legal tender coin containing one ounce of 24-karat (.9999) gold. It will bear the W mint mark of the United States Mint at West Point, New York.

The coin design is based on the original 1913, Type I Buffalo nickel, by James Earle Fraser. On the obverse is a Native American profile, and the reverse features an American Buffalo, or bison.

On the obverse are the inscriptions “Liberty,” “2006,” the initial “F” for Fraser, and the “W” mint mark. The reverse will carry the inscriptions “$50” and “1 oz. .9999 Fine Gold” incused on the grassy mound beneath the buffalo, “United States of America,” “E Pluribus Unum,” and “In God We Trust.”

Priced at $800.00, with a mintage limit of up to 300,000 coins, the American Buffalo Gold Proof Coin will be encapsulated in plastic to protect its pristine, proof finish. It is packaged in a blue United States Mint gift box and accompanied by a custom-designed Certificate of Authenticity. Orders will be limited to 10 per order and household. The United States Mint may change these limits at any time.

The Presidential $1 Coin Act of 2005, which authorized the production of the proof coin, also requires the United States Mint to produce a bullion version of the American Buffalo Gold Coin. It will be available through the same network of dealers that currently sell the American Eagle Gold Bullion Coins to the public.

- By US Mint

Wednesday, June 21, 2006

United States Mint Strikes First Pure Gold U.S. Coins for Investors & Collectors


Pressing two big buttons, United States Mint officials struck some of the first American Buffalo Gold Coins, marking the first time ever the United States Government has minted pure (.9999) 24-karat gold coins for investors and collectors. The coins, in bullion and proof versions, go on sale Thursday, June 22, 2006.

The United States Mint will produce the one-ounce $50.00 face value legal tender coin containing .9999 gold in a bullion version for investors and a proof version for collectors.

“This American Buffalo Gold Coin will appeal to both investors who choose to hold gold and to others who simply love gold,” said Deputy Director David A. Lebryk during the ceremonial striking at the United States Mint at West Point, where the coins are being produced. “These classic and beautiful American Indian and buffalo designs by James Earle Fraser, which have been American favorites since they were first used in 1913, recall a golden age of coin artistry.”

The United States Mint will transfer two of the historic American Buffalo Gold Coins to the Smithsonian Institution’s coin collection on Thursday, June 22.

The Presidential $1 Coin Act of 2005 mandated the production of the American Buffalo Gold Coin. Both the American Buffalo Gold Bullion and Proof Coins portray the images of the revered Buffalo Nickel of 1913, Type 1. The iconic James Earle Fraser image of an American bison graces the reverse (tails side), and Fraser’s classic design of an American Indian is featured on the obverse (heads side). The American Buffalo Gold Coin has inscriptions of the coin’s weight, denomination and gold content incused on the reverse (Buffalo side) in the design area commonly known as the “grassy mound.” The inscriptions read “$50,” “1 OZ” and “.9999 FINE GOLD.” The proof version will bear the W mint mark of the United States Mint at West Point, New York. The price for the proof coin is $800.

During 2006, the American Buffalo Gold Bullion Coins will be available in a one-ounce version only.

American Buffalo Gold Bullion Coins are sold by the United States Mint to Authorized Purchasers based on the current price of gold plus a small premium to cover minting, distribution and marketing costs. These companies, which sell the coins into the secondary market, must meet strict financial and trading requirements to qualify as Authorized Purchasers. To find a bullion coin retailer, consumers should go to http://www.usmint.gov/bullionretailer or call 1-800-USA-GOLD, (872-4653).

Sales for the bullion coins begin on June 22, 2006.

The American Buffalo Gold Proof Coin will have a mintage limit of up to 300,000 coins. Customers may order these proof coins directly from the United States Mint on June 22, 2006, beginning at noon Eastern Time. Encapsulated in plastic to protect its pristine, proof finish, it is packaged in a blue United States Mint gift box and accompanied by a custom-designed certificate of authenticity.





- By US Mint

Teletrade Moves to New and Larger Offices

To accommodate the continuing expansion of its business operations, Teletrade has moved to new, larger offices in Irvine, California.

The new offices are nearly double the size of Teletrade's previous office space three blocks away.

The new mailing address for Teletrade is 18061 Fitch Ave., Irvine, CA 92614.

The toll-free phone numbers and Internet addresses remain the same.

-By Teletrade

ANACS Celebrates 34 Years

It was 34 years ago--June 15, 1972--that ANACS certified its first coin. The milestone was briefly celebrated at ANACS' new Austin, Texas offices by the entire staff.

ANACS was created by the American Numismatic Association (ANA) with a mission to correct an urgent problem facing the coin hobby--counterfeit coins. The ANA is a century-old, not-for-profit educational association for collectors of coins, tokens, medals and paper money. The ANA, like the U.S. Olympic Association and the American Red Cross, is chartered by the U.S. Congress.

In the early 1970's, the ANA board of governors recognized that something significant needed to be done about all the counterfeit and altered coins that were plaguing the coin community. Their solution was ANACS, the American Numismatic Association Certification Service. ANACS began with a staff of two experts with Washington D.C. as its home. Washington was chosen in order to utilize the Smithsonian’s Numismatic Collection and to be near the Treasury Department, specifically the Secret Service.

This was a time when many people could never be quite certain if the coins they were purchasing, or even selling, were genuine. Little had been written on the subject and the science of counterfeit detection of coins was still in its infancy. ANACS certified its first coin as genuine on June 15, 1972. As the need for the service grew and as the benefits were proven over and over, additional experts were added to ANACS’ staff.

In 1976, ANACS was moved to Colorado Springs where ANA had its headquarters. Three years later, ANACS began grading coins using the technical grading standards that the ANA and ANACS had established earlier with its book, “The Official American Numismatic Association Grading Standards for United States Coins,” a monumental work that the ANACS staff helped create. Coins were given a technical grade for each side, obverse and then reverse (e.g., MS-65/63). The service took off and within a few years ANACS was grading nearly 3,000 coins a month. (Today, that would be a typical day at ANACS!) No one had yet thought of encapsulating the coins in plastic holders. Instead, ANACS issued a photo certificate showing both sides of a coin, its dual grades and pertinent comments about the coin.

In 1983, Kenneth E. Bressett was appointed Director of ANACS. Ken was then, and still is today, the long-time editor of the “Red Book” and a frequent numismatic author and speaker. Ken hired and trained a team of graders at ANACS, many of whom moved on to become some of the most famous names in the coin community. Many are still professionally grading coins today, others are leading coin dealers, while still others are highly respected numismatic researchers and authors. Recently, ANACS saw the return of Miles Standish to its Grading Team. Miles was one of those graders that Ken Bressett hired and trained at ANACS more than 20 years earlier.

In 1989 ANACS discontinued issuing photo certificates and began encapsulating coins in plastic holders. A year later, the ANA board of governors sold ANACS to Amos Press, publishers of Coin World. In March 2005, Anderson Press, the parent company of hobby cornerstones Whitman Publishing and the former H.E. Harris, became the proud owners of ANACS and its rich and noble history. In April 2006, ANACS relocated its headquarters to Austin, Texas.

- By ANACS

Friday, June 16, 2006

DENVER QUARTER LAUNCHED IN DENVER CEREMONY



The newest quarter in the United States Mint’s 50 State Quarters® Program was launched today at the Colorado State Capitol following a procession by horse-drawn stagecoach that began five blocks away and brought quarters from the United States Mint at Denver. The stagecoach was greeted at the state capitol by Assistant Secretary of the Treasury Sandra Pack, United States Mint Deputy Director David A. Lebryk, Colorado Governor Bill Owens, First Lady Frances Owens and Denver Mayor John Hickenlooper.

The new quarter depicts a sweeping view of the rugged Rocky Mountains and bears a banner with the inscription “Colorful Colorado.”

“This quarter evokes Colorado’s rainbow of beauty and color,” said Deputy Director Lebryk, “what the anthem “America the Beautiful” calls ‘purple mountains majesty.’ Today, we celebrate the launch of a beautiful addition to the 50 State Quarters program, and the centennial anniversary of the United States Mint at Denver, one of two proud facilities that together will make up to 650 million “Colorful Colorado” quarters.”

The Colorado quarter also bears the inscriptions “Colorado” and “1876,” the year Colorado became a state. Colorado, nicknamed the “Centennial State,” was admitted into the Union on August 1, 1876, becoming our Nation’s 38th state. The Colorado quarter is the 38th coin in the United States Mint’s 50 State Quarters Program and the third commemorative quarter-dollar released in 2006.

Following the launch ceremony, Assistant Secretary Pack, Deputy Director Lebryk, Governor and First Lady Owens and Mayor Hickenlooper handed out shiny, new Colorado quarters to the children in the crowd. Adults lined up to exchange their bills for $10 rolls of Colorado quarters.

The United States Mint also hosted a Coin Collectors Forum at the Auraria Campus on the eve of the launch in which the public was asked to share their ideas on coin programs and coin design.

The Colorado quarter is available in two-roll sets (40 coins per roll) including one roll each from the United States Mint at Philadelphia and Denver, and in bags of 100 and 1,000 coins, at the United States Mint website at www.usmint.gov. The two-roll sets are $32.00, bags of 100 coins are $35.50, and bags of 1,000 coins are $300.00.

- By US Mint

“Return to Monticello” Nickels Featured in United States Mint 2006 Spring Gift Catalog

The United States Mint announced today that the 2006 United States Mint Spring Gift Catalog, featuring the 2006 “Return to Monticello” First Day Coin Cover and Two-Roll Sets, which concludes the historic Westward Journey Nickel Series™, will be available by mail and online beginning June 13, 2006.

“This new catalog presents a wide variety of products that reflect our finest work,” said United States Mint Deputy Director Dave Lebryk in his letter to collectors, “from beautiful precious metal coinage in gold, silver and platinum, to the educational value reflected in our Beginner Basics set, and the annual sets that form the foundation of numismatic collections around the world.”

Limited to 50,000 sets, each “Return to Monticello” First Day Coin Cover sells for $19.95 and features two nickels from the first day of production (one each from the United States Mint at Philadelphia and Denver) and a $.39 United States Lady Liberty and Flag stamp and postal cancellation from the coins’ first day of release to the Federal Reserve.

Collectors can also celebrate the conclusion of the Westward Journey Nickel Series™ by purchasing specially wrapped rolls of the 2006 “Return to Monticello” nickel. Each two-roll set, priced at $8.95, includes 80 nickels from the main production floors of the facilities that manufacture all U.S. circulating coins: one roll of 40 coins with the Philadelphia mint mark and one roll of 40 coins with the Denver mint mark.

For those just starting their collection, Collecting America’s Coins: Beginner Basics, provides the perfect introduction to numismatics. An informative booklet familiarizes new collectors with the language of the hobby, and explains some of the processes involved in making our Nation’s coinage. The set also includes a one-cent planchet; a pair of circulating one-cent coins; a pair of uncirculated, satin finish dimes and a proof half-dollar, all for $14.50.

Collectors will also welcome the return of genuine United States Mint collector boxes in two sizes. Priced at $12.95, the small size is designed to fit the single package of either the 2006 United States Mint 50 State Quarters Proof Set™ or the 2006 United States Mint 50 State Quarters Silver Proof Set™. The large size, priced at $13.95, holds 10 sets of either the 2006 United States Mint Proof Set® or the 2006 United States Mint Silver Proof Set™, each with two packages per set.

The popular 50 State Quarters® Coin and Die Sets feature the first two 2006 quarters, honoring Nevada and Nebraska. Each Coin and Die Set includes a completely defaced die, one of the first 2006-dated quarters struck with that die and a numbered Certificate of Authenticity, priced at $34.95.

Medals featured in this year’s spring catalog include one of the most popular medals produced by the United States Mint, the White House medal. The obverse of the White House medal depicts the classic north portico and the reverse features John and Abigail Adams, the first residents of the Executive Mansion. The 3-inch bronze medal is $38.00 and the 1½-inch medal $3.75.

Annual sets and special products also featured in the 2006 United States Mint Spring Gift Catalog include:

The 2006 United States Mint 50 State Quarters Silver Proof Set™ at $23.95;

The 2006 United States Mint Silver Proof Set at $37.95™;

The 2006 United States Mint 50 State Quarters Proof Set™ at $15.95;

The 2006 United States Mint Proof Set® at $22.95;

The 2006 American Eagle Silver Proof Coin for $27.95;

The 2006 American Eagle Gold and Platinum Proof Coins – in 1/10 ounce, ¼ ounce and ½ ounce, one ounce denominations, and in four-coin sets. Note: The American Eagle Gold Proof one-ounce coin is sold out.

2006 Kennedy Half-Dollar 200-Coin Bags (P or D Mint mark) for $135;

2006 Kennedy Half-Dollar Two-Roll Sets for $35.50;

2006 Golden Dollar 250-Coin Bags (P or D Mint mark) for $347;

2006 Golden Dollar Coin Rolls (P or D Mint mark) for $35.50;

Charles M. Schulz Bronze Medals for $38.00 (3-inch) and $3.75 (1½-inch);

Thomas Jefferson Peace Medals for $38.00 (3-inch) and $3.50 (1 5/16-inch).

- By US Mint

United States Mint Offers Colorado Quarters in Bags & Two-Roll Sets

The United States Mint announced today that commemorative quarter-dollar coins honoring Colorado, the third coin in the United States Mint’s 50 State Quarters® Program to be released in 2006, will go on sale beginning June 14, 2006, at noon (ET), and will be available for approximately 10 weeks. The Colorado quarter-dollars are available in two-roll sets (40 coins per roll), including one roll each from the United States Mints at Philadelphia and Denver, and in bags of 100 and 1,000 coins.

Each coin roll in the two-roll set is presented in a specially designed United States Mint paper coin wrap that prominently displays the 50 State Quarters Program logo, a “P” or “D” representing the roll’s mint of origin, “CO” designating the State of Colorado, and “$10” representing its dollar value. Two-roll sets will sell for $32.00, bags of 100 coins for $35.50, and bags of 1,000 coins for $300.00. Each bag is marked with the mint of origin and the dollar value of its contents ($25.00 or $250.00). These bags and two-roll sets feature quarters used in regular transactions and are struck on our main production floors at the United States Mints at Philadelphia and Denver. There is no order limit on these products.

Colorado was admitted into the Union on August 1, 1876, becoming our Nation's 38th state. With statehood gained less than one month after the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, Colorado is nicknamed the "Centennial State." The Colorado quarter depicts a sweeping view of the State's rugged Rocky Mountains with evergreen trees and a banner carrying the inscription "Colorful Colorado." The coin also bears the inscriptions "Colorado" and "1876."

- By US Mint

Monday, June 12, 2006

Historic ABNCo Archives at Memphis Show

Selected treasures from the American Bank Note Company (ABNCo) archives will be one of the major attractions at the 30th International Paper Money Show in Memphis, Tennessee, June 15 to 18. American Numismatic Rarities of Wolfeboro, New Hampshire will display printing plates, cylinder dies (“rollers”), and vignette dies dating from the early 19th to 20th centuries.

“These are one of a kind and so rare that most collectors and dealers have never seen them! The display is the tip of the numismatic iceberg of archive material that will be coming to the market later this year. There will be literally thousands of collectible, displayable items from different banks, states, and other entities -- Americana at its finest,” said Chris Karstedt, President of American Numismatic Rarities.

A highlight of the ABNCo display in Memphis will be an original printing plate from the Union Bank of the State of Tennessee, Nashville. Impressions from this unique plate, by Draper, Underwood, Bald & Spencer, are unlisted in James A. Haxby’s 1988 four-volume set, Obsolete Bank Notes.

“This plate, which measures 8.9 inches wide by 13.27 inches high, was recently removed from the original wrapping paper in which it was placed in the 1850s when Draper, Underwood, Bald & Spencer became a part of ABNCo.,” explained Karstedt.

ABNCo and its member firms dominated the bank-note and security printing business in the 19th century. Not only was currency printing done for banks all across the country and many foreign countries, but ABNCo was the prime printer of federal “greenback” and other notes for the federal government from 1861 to 1875.

The treasures to be auctioned by American Numismatic Rarities represent an absolutely unique opportunity for collectors, dealers, and museums. No archive like this will ever be offered again, simply because nothing else like it was ever formed,” said Karstedt.

On hand to discuss the forthcoming sales and answer questions will be Q. David Bowers, author of the forthcoming, 600-page Whitman book, Obsolete Paper Money Issued by Banks in the United States 1782 to 1866. In full color and quality hardbound, this book can be ordered now for a special pre-publication price to assure buyers they will be among the first to receive copies upon publication this autumn.






- By ANR

United States Mint to Receive White House Environmental Award

The United States Mint will receive the 2006 White House “Closing the Circle Award” for its excellent environmental management system, the Office of the Federal Environmental Executive has announced. The agency is one of 16 winners of the award, which recognizes Federal agencies and employees for outstanding achievement in environmental stewardship.

The United States Mint environmental team will receive the award on June 12 at a ceremony at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building.

“We at the United States Mint believe that being environmentally responsible is not only an obligation we have to the public but also a practice that makes good business sense,” said United States Mint Deputy Director David A. Lebryk. “This award recognizes our hard work and commitment in sustaining a high level of environmental stewardship.”

The United States Mints at Denver, Philadelphia and West Point, all production facilities, have implemented an environmental management system that meets the environmental standards set by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). The three facilities have implemented ISO 14001, which is a premier certified environmental management system. The system is a valuable tool to help organizations meet compliance regulations, improve and maintain environmental performance, and increase the use of pollution prevention.

This year’s 16 White House Closing the Circle Award winners and 11 honorable mentions were selected from 200 nominations in the following seven categories: waste/pollution prevention, recycling, green purchasing, environmental management systems, sustainable design/green buildings, and alternative fuel and fuel conservation.

Created by Executive Order, the Office of the Federal Environmental Executive is a chartered task force under the White House Council on Environmental Quality. It works to promote sustainable environmental stewardship throughout the Federal government by assisting agencies in integrating environmental considerations into their operations.

- by US Mint

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